First-Year Seminar Courses | Pepperdine University | Seaver College

First-Year Seminar Courses

Course Descriptions: Spring 2018

Inspirational Teaching

GSHU 199.01 | Stella Erbes | TuFr 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Inspirational Teaching: Why does a particular teacher or learning experience stand out above others from your academic career? What factors contribute to the making of an effective teacher? What innovative methods can teachers implement to connect with students in today's classrooms? These are just a few other questions that can be explored in this seminar. This course focuses on what is revealed through current educational research. Students will be able to: 1) Understand major areas of research in curriculum and instruction; 2) Evaluate a variety of professional articles and studies in terms of validity, methodology, findings, and conclusions; 3) Synthesize research articles and studies into a coherent and appropriate literature review; and 4) Propose an original research study related to the field of education Spring 2018. 

What is Childhood?

GSHU 199.02 | Katherine Frye | MoTh 2:00pm – 3:30pm

What is Childhood?: Has the idea of childhood, the perception of childhood as a protected season of innocence and dependence, always existed, spanning all centuries and crossing all borders? We will take this inquiry as the point of departure for our class, starting in the seventeenth century and continuing through the twenty-first century. In doing so, we will examine historical sources, medical and childrearing discourse, and representations of childhood in poetry, prose, and film. Along the way, we will discuss children as consumers, read Where the Wild Things Are, consider what technology is doing to/for kids today, learn about the role the outdoors plays into our development, and ruminate on such powerhouses of modern film as Pixar. More generally, our course will strive to build learning communities, to sharpen critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, to enhance effective communication, to improve information literacy, to apply the University's Christian mission, and to hone life-management skills. 

What is Childhood?

GSHU 199.03 | Katherine Frye | MoWe 4:00pm – 5:30pm

What is Childhood?: Has the idea of childhood, the perception of childhood as a protected season of innocence and dependence, always existed, spanning all centuries and crossing all borders? We will take this inquiry as the point of departure for our class, starting in the seventeenth century and continuing through the twenty-first century. In doing so, we will examine historical sources, medical and childrearing discourse, and representations of childhood in poetry, prose, and film. Along the way, we will discuss children as consumers, read Where the Wild Things Are, consider what technology is doing to/for kids today, learn about the role the outdoors plays into our development, and ruminate on such powerhouses of modern film as Pixar. More generally, our course will strive to build learning communities, to sharpen critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, to enhance effective communication, to improve information literacy, to apply the University's Christian mission, and to hone life-management skills.

Spiritual Autobiography: Sharing our Experiences with God

GSHU 199.04 | Lisa Smith | TuFr 2:00pm - 3:30pm

Spiritual Autobiography: Sharing our Experiences with God: As humans, we enjoy sharing our experiences with others- whether they relate to sports, family, media, or God. This class will examine some of the ways individuals process and share their experiences with God by studying spiritual autobiographies that span time, gender, and class. We will also discuss our own spiritual experiences and explore how to process and communicate them. Emphasis will be on Christianity, but all faiths will be represented in the readings and are welcome in the class. 

 

Spiritual Autobiography: Sharing our Experiences with God

GSHU 199.05 | Lisa Smith | We 12:00 pm - 2:50pm

Spiritual Autobiography: Sharing our Experiences with God: As humans, we enjoy sharing our experiences with others- whether they relate to sports, family, media, or God. This class will examine some of the ways individuals process and share their experiences with God by studying spiritual autobiographies that span time, gender, and class. We will also discuss our own spiritual experiences and explore how to process and communicate them. Emphasis will be on Christianity, but all faiths will be represented in the readings and are welcome in the class.

Discovering Your Strengths

GSRE 199.01 | Doug Hurley | MoTh 8:00am – 9:30am

Discovering Your Strengths: This course will challenge students to stop focusing on weaknesses and live life out of God-given talents and abilities. Students will take the Strengths Finder assessment as well as the Myers Briggs Type Indicator in order to learn more about their natural tendencies in a variety of circumstances. The course will explore the concepts of vocation, leadership, and service which are the foundations of a life well lived.