First-Year Seminar Courses

Course Descriptions: Fall 2018

Geography of Surfing

GSBA 199.01 | Robert Shearer | MoTh 10:00am - 11:30am

Geography of Surfing: Pepperdine students have an opportunity during their four years in Malibu to surf some of the best waves in the world. Many of us make a unique connection with God while out in the water. This course aims to amplify this experience, helping students to understand the complexity of the system that produces the waves that we surf. The better that we understand the world that God created for us, the better we understand God. Geography of Surfing is an introduction to the science behind surfing. The course will cover the life of a wave from before its birth in an oceanic storm to its final dissipation on the shore. The course will also explain the impact of temperature, winds, and tides on waves. Students will learn to make their own wave forecasts using isobar charts and other weather related measurements.

Resisting Evil/Hitler

GSCL 199.01 | David Dowdey | MoTh 10:00am - 11:30am

Resisting Evil/Hitler: This course surveys accounts of people in the German Resistance from 1933-45 in order to understand, compare, think critically, and write about the various decisions of conscience made by these individuals. Their stories will help us to act responsibly in the face of evil in our own day and age. A further objective of the course is to help you adjust to life at Pepperdine as you make the transition into full adulthood. Finally, the course is intended to facilitate the formation of a group with which you identify strongly and positively.

Excursions in Italian Culture

GSCL 199.02 | Fiona Steward | MoTh 12:00pm – 1:30pm

Excursions in Italian Culture: Italian writer Beppe Severgnini says: “First of all, let's get one thing straight. Your Italy and our Italia are not the same thing. Italy is a soft drug peddled in predictable packages, such as hills in the sunset, olive groves, lemon trees, white wine, and raven-haired girls. Italia, on the other hand, is a maze. It's alluring, but complicated. It's the kind of place that can have you fuming and then purring in the space of a hundred meters, or in the course of ten minutes. Italy is the only workshop in the world that can turn out both Botticellis and Berlusconis”. This seminar explores both Italy’s “predictable packages” and aspects of its “alluring, but complicated” culture. Which is which and why should it be so? Was it always this way? This seminar draws on cultural artifacts, ancient and modern, to provide encounters with these expressions of another culture that encourage students to reflect critically on their own culture’s values and assumptions, past and present.

Lessons from Spain

GSCL 199.03 | Paul Begin | W 12:00pm - 3:00pm

Lessons from Spain:The academic focus of this courses is Spanish culture and cinema. This course is designed to provide an overview of Spanish culture and history through film and other texts while also considering the bigger question of what matters most.

Debate, Dialogue, Advocacy

GSCO 199.01 | Abigail Williams | W 12:00 pm - 2:50pm

Debate, Dialogue, Advocacy: Desmond Tutu said, "Don't raise your voice, improve your argument." In this class, students will explore contemporary issues from varying perspectives through debate and advocacy training. Our world, and the United States specifically, is experiencing a time of extreme polarization. Isaiah 59:4 admonishes God's people saying, "No one calls for justice; no one pleads his case with integrity. They rely on empty arguments and speak lies . . . ." This class teaches students to advance ethical and appropriate arguments in a variety of situations, acknowledging that good people can hold different perspectives. It specifically teaches students how to effectively build, analyze and refute arguments; utilizing a competitive debate format.

Communication Through Music and Sound

GSCO 199.04 Chris Stivers TuTh 4:00pm -5:30pm

Communication Through Music and Sound: Humans utilize multiple sensory channels to communicate. In addition to verbal symbols and characteristics of the human voice, music and other sounds are used to communicate. This class will explore the communication process and perception as they relate to the intentional use of sound and music for communication and storytelling, emotional and artistic expression, worship, the passing on of culture, and persuasion.

American Language and Culture

GSEN 199.01 | Elizabeth Dillion | TuTh 4:00pm – 5:30pm

American Language and Culture: Students refine their use of idiomatic English through the study of the mass media and literary selections, discussion, computer-assisted instruction, sentence combining, and modeling. The course promotes cross-cultural understanding and develops the ability of non-native speakers to think and communicate clearly. Must be taken concurrently with ENG 100. Satisfies the first-year seminar general education requirement.

American Language and Culture

GSEN 199.02 | Julie Oni| Tu 6:00pm – 8:50pm

American Language and Culture: Students refine their use of idiomatic English through the study of the mass media and literary selections, discussion, computer-assisted instruction, sentence combining, and modeling. The course promotes cross-cultural understanding and develops the ability of non-native speakers to think and communicate clearly. Must be taken concurrently with ENG 100. Satisfies the first-year seminar general education requirement.

A Life in Music

GSFA 199.01 | Ryan Board| TuFr 10:00am - 11:30am

A Life in Music This course engages students in a multifaceted approach to exploring a life in professional classical music and looks at what it means to be an artist. Students will be challenged to think critically and look deeply into the professional world of music performance, composition, and education through various readings and interactions with guest speakers and lecturers. Included is a representative overview of important styles, time periods, composers and musical genres, as well as the opportunity to develop critical research and scholarly writing skills related to music. Physical, mental, and spiritual health, as well as issues related to finance and professionalism will be addressed. All first-year music majors are encouraged to take this course.

Art and Faith in the Medieval Mediterranean World

GSFA 199.02 | Cynthia Colburn |

Art and Faith in the Medieval Mediterranean World: Bordered by the continents of Asia, Africa, and Europe, the Mediterranean Sea simultaneously connects and divides peoples and faith traditions. In this class we will explore Medieval art and architecture that served the intellectual, emotional, and spiritual needs of diverse groups of Jews, Christians, and Muslims from the fourth to the fourteenth centuries AD. Through visits to local museums, including the Getty Center, firsthand study of Medieval manuscripts, and in-class discussions, this course will highlight the plurality of Medieval society and its relevance to today.

Great Books Colloquium

GSHU 121.01 | Tuan Hong | TuFr 8:00am – 9:50am

Great Books Colloquium: Students who enroll in Great Books I are automatically enrolled in the Great Books program, which consists of four integrated seminars devoted to the study of Great Books from ancient Greece to the present day. In Great Books I, students consider works of philosophy, literature, religion, and political thought of the ancient world. Authors include Homer, Greek tragedians, Plato, Aristotle, and Virgil. The course is discussion-based and involves close reading of texts and intensive writing. Each seminar is limited to 16 students. Prerequisite: Eligibility for entry in English Composition 101. (GE) Great Books I fulfills the First Year Seminar Requirement, and completion of the four-course sequence fulfills five general education requirements.

Great Books Colloquium

GSHU 121.02 | Tuan Hong | TuFr 10:00am – 11:50am

Great Books Colloquium: Students who enroll in Great Books I are automatically enrolled in the Great Books program, which consists of four integrated seminars devoted to the study of Great Books from ancient Greece to the present day. In Great Books I, students consider works of philosophy, literature, religion, and political thought of the ancient world. Authors include Homer, Greek tragedians, Plato, Aristotle, and Virgil. The course is discussion-based and involves close reading of texts and intensive writing. Each seminar is limited to 16 students. Prerequisite: Eligibility for entry in English Composition 101. (GE) Great Books I fulfills the First Year Seminar Requirement, and completion of the four-course sequence fulfills five general education requirements.

Great Books Colloquium

GSHU 121.03 | Jacqueline Dillion | MoTh 2:00pm – 3:50pm

Great Books Colloquium: Students who enroll in Great Books I are automatically enrolled in the Great Books program, which consists of four integrated seminars devoted to the study of Great Books from ancient Greece to the present day. In Great Books I, students consider works of philosophy, literature, religion, and political thought of the ancient world. Authors include Homer, Greek tragedians, Plato, Aristotle, and Virgil. The course is discussion-based and involves close reading of texts and intensive writing. Each seminar is limited to 16 students. Prerequisite: Eligibility for entry in English Composition 101. (GE) Great Books I fulfills the First Year Seminar Requirement, and completion of the four-course sequence fulfills five general education requirements.

Great Books Colloquium

GSHU 121.04 | Phillip Freemna | TuFr 2:00pm – 3:50pm

Great Books Colloquium: Students who enroll in Great Books I are automatically enrolled in the Great Books program, which consists of four integrated seminars devoted to the study of Great Books from ancient Greece to the present day. In Great Books I, students consider works of philosophy, literature, religion, and political thought of the ancient world. Authors include Homer, Greek tragedians, Plato, Aristotle, and Virgil. The course is discussion-based and involves close reading of texts and intensive writing. Each seminar is limited to 16 students. Prerequisite: Eligibility for entry in English Composition 101. (GE) Great Books I fulfills the First Year Seminar Requirement, and completion of the four-course sequence fulfills five general education requirements.

Great Books Colloquium

GSHU 121.05 | Michael Gose | MoTh 10:00am – 11:50am

Great Books Colloquium: Students who enroll in Great Books I are automatically enrolled in the Great Books program, which consists of four integrated seminars devoted to the study of Great Books from ancient Greece to the present day. In Great Books I, students consider works of philosophy, literature, religion, and political thought of the ancient world. Authors include Homer, Greek tragedians, Plato, Aristotle, and Virgil. The course is discussion-based and involves close reading of texts and intensive writing. Each seminar is limited to 16 students. Prerequisite: Eligibility for entry in English Composition 101. (GE) Great Books I fulfills the First Year Seminar Requirement, and completion of the four-course sequence fulfills five general education requirements.

Great Books Colloquium

GSHU 121.06 | Frank Novak | MoTh 8:00am – 9:50am

Great Books Colloquium: Students who enroll in Great Books I are automatically enrolled in the Great Books program, which consists of four integrated seminars devoted to the study of Great Books from ancient Greece to the present day. In Great Books I, students consider works of philosophy, literature, religion, and political thought of the ancient world. Authors include Homer, Greek tragedians, Plato, Aristotle, and Virgil. The course is discussion-based and involves close reading of texts and intensive writing. Each seminar is limited to 16 students. Prerequisite: Eligibility for entry in English Composition 101. (GE) Great Books I fulfills the First Year Seminar Requirement, and completion of the four-course sequence fulfills five general education requirements.

Great Books Colloquium

GSHU 121.07 | Frank Novak | MoTh 12:00pm – 1:50pm

Great Books Colloquium: Students who enroll in Great Books I are automatically enrolled in the Great Books program, which consists of four integrated seminars devoted to the study of Great Books from ancient Greece to the present day. In Great Books I, students consider works of philosophy, literature, religion, and political thought of the ancient world. Authors include Homer, Greek tragedians, Plato, Aristotle, and Virgil. The course is discussion-based and involves close reading of texts and intensive writing. Each seminar is limited to 16 students. Prerequisite: Eligibility for entry in English Composition 101. (GE) Great Books I fulfills the First Year Seminar Requirement, and completion of the four-course sequence fulfills five general education requirements.

Crusades

GSHU 199.01 | Bryan Givens | MoTh 2:00pm – 3:30pm

Crusades: This course is a comprehensive overview of the struggle between Western European Crusaders and Muslims for control of the Holy Land, particularly in the period from the late eleventh century to the late thirteenth century. While focusing on the Holy Land, it will also examine the ‘internal’ Crusades in Spain, the Baltic, and in Southern France. This course will not simply be a list of names, dates, and battles, however. It will analyze the varying motives behind the conflicts and their immediate and long-term consequences. The course will examine the subject from the viewpoints of the Latin Crusaders, the Byzantines, and the Arab and Turkish Muslims of the Levant from original sources, and will pay particular attention to the long-term legacies of the Crusades both in Europe and in the Middle East. It will also assess and critique popular conceptions of the Crusades, particularly as revealed in film.

Spiritual Autobiography: Sharing our Experiences with God

GSHU 199.02 | Lisa Smith| We 12:00pm - 2:50pm

Spiritual Autobiography: Sharing our Experiences with God As humans, we enjoy sharing our experiences with others—whether they relate to sports, family, media, or God. This class will examine some of the ways individuals process and share their experiences with God by studying spiritual autobiographies that span time, gender, and class. We will also discuss our own spiritual experiences and explore how to process and communicate them. Emphasis will be on Christianity, but all faiths will be represented in the readings and are welcome in the class.

Vocation and Calling

GSHU 199.03 | John Peterson | We 11:30am – 2:20pm

Vocation and Calling: The questions we ask during our undergraduate years shape our lives in the years to come. Although we may not answer these questions, at least not right away, it is important that we ask— and keep asking—the right questions. I believe the most important question a student can ask during this time is: What is the nature of my calling? Although popular conceptions of the word “calling” tend to focus on the work we are paid to perform in the world, calling is a far more expansive concept than this definition suggests. While inclusive of paid work, calling encompasses our relationships to God, self, family, community, course study, and even the nature of our leisure time. To who and to what are we called? This is the question that animates the heart of this course. My hope is that in taking this class it will animate your time at Pepperdine and in the years to come.

The Cult of Modern Childhood

GSHU 199.04 | Anne-Katherine Frye | TuFr 2:00pm – 3:30pm

The Cult of Modern Childhood: What is childhood? Has the idea of childhood, the perception of childhood as a protected season of innocence and dependence, always existed, spanning all centuries and crossing all borders? We will take this inquiry as the point of departure for our class, starting in the seventeenth century and continuing through the twenty-first century. In so doing, we will examine historical sources, medical and childrearing discourse, and representations of childhood in poetry, prose, and film. Along the way, we will discuss children as consumers, read Where the Wild Things Are, consider what technology is doing to/for kids today, learn about the role the outdoors plays in our development, and ruminate on such powerhouses of modern film as Pixar. More generally, our course will strive to build learning communities, to sharpen critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, to enhance effective communication, to improve information literacy, to apply the University’s Christian mission, and to hone life-management skills.

The Cult of Modern Childhood

GSHU 199.05 | Anne-Katherine Frye | TuFr 12:00pm – 1:30pm

The Cult of Modern Childhood: What is childhood? Has the idea of childhood, the perception of childhood as a protected season of innocence and dependence, always existed, spanning all centuries and crossing all borders? We will take this inquiry as the point of departure for our class, starting in the seventeenth century and continuing through the twenty-first century. In so doing, we will examine historical sources, medical and childrearing discourse, and representations of childhood in poetry, prose, and film. Along the way, we will discuss children as consumers, read Where the Wild Things Are, consider what technology is doing to/for kids today, learn about the role the outdoors plays in our development, and ruminate on such powerhouses of modern film as Pixar. More generally, our course will strive to build learning communities, to sharpen critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, to enhance effective communication, to improve information literacy, to apply the University’s Christian mission, and to hone life-management skills.

The Cult of Modern Childhood

GSHU 199 | Anne-Katherine Frye| TuFr 8:00am – 9:30am

The Cult of Modern Childhood: What is childhood? Has the idea of childhood, the perception of childhood as a protected season of innocence and dependence, always existed, spanning all centuries and crossing all borders? We will take this inquiry as the point of departure for our class, starting in the seventeenth century and continuing through the twenty-first century. In so doing, we will examine historical sources, medical and childrearing discourse, and representations of childhood in poetry, prose, and film. Along the way, we will discuss children as consumers, read Where the Wild Things Are, consider what technology is doing to/for kids today, learn about the role the outdoors plays in our development, and ruminate on such powerhouses of modern film as Pixar. More generally, our course will strive to build learning communities, to sharpen critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, to enhance effective communication, to improve information literacy, to apply the University’s Christian mission, and to hone life-management skills.

Poetry for Non-Poetic People

GSHU 199.06 | James Thomas | MoTh 2:00pm – 3:30pm

Poetry for Non-Poetic People: This course attempts to de-mystify poetry and make it accessible and enjoyable to all readers. Many students’ classroom studies of poetry are organized chronologically, consist of only British or American poetry, and contain works they find to be pretentious, esoteric, or obscure—with the results being that the more vibrant, contemporary, and, most importantly, unconventional poems are often overlooked. We will examine poems from all time periods that treat classic themes and subjects like love, war, grief, politics, athletics, animals, and poetry itself. The course will focus on poems that exemplify clarity, originality, and social concerns—such as works by Robert Frost, e. e. cummings, Gwendolyn Brooks, Kay Ryan, and Billy Collins. In order to address and, hopefully, eradicate a dislike of all things poetic, the right poems must be chosen to share with students—poems that are comprehensible and related to topics of great interest to them. This is the specific goal of each class meeting. The overall goal of the course is that students will discover that they are not non-poetic after all.

*Plant Adaptations to Stressful Environments

GSNS 199.01* | Stephen Davis(Seminars in Biology) |

Plant Adaptations to Stressful Environments: Native plants that blanket the hillsides of Pepperdine’s campus in Malibu are usually adapted to survive stressful conditions, but tolerance levels have recently been exceeded due to climate change. Students in this seminar will undertake authentic scholarly research on one of the most pressing issues concerning our future well-being in California: will adaptations of native vegetation be sufficient to withstand an increasingly rapid change in climate? Students will assess plant water status, dehydration tolerance, photosynthetic performance, plant water use, and dysfunction in vascular transport.

*The Cell Biology of Stress

GSNS 199.02* | Jay Brewster (Seminars in Biology) |

The Cell Biology of Stress: This class is a part of the seminars in biology series. The focus of the class will be upon the fundamental principles of biological systems. These principles can be studied in simple model systems such as cultured animal and bacterial cells. We will engage in an exploration of cell biology and key discoveries that have led to our current understanding of living systems. With increasing industrialization and human population growth, air pollution has become an environmental threat to human health. Nanoparticles increasingly pollute the air we breathe. Students in this seminar will examine the impact of nanoparticulate pollutants upon cells in culture and simple nematode model organisms. Students will engage in independent research to examine cellular stress, survival, and biochemical activity. A theme through the semester will be conversations about vocation, purpose, and engaging with the Pepperdine community. 

*Animal Ecology and Conservation

GSNS 199.03* | Javier Monzon | MoTh 12:00pm - 1:30pm

Animal Ecology and Conservation:Pepperdine University's Malibu campus is nestled in the foothills of the Santa Monica Mountains. This physical setting provides numerous opportunities to explore the ecology of many very different ecosystems that are in close proximity, such as oak woodlands, chaparral, salt marshes, sandy beaches, rocky intertidal pools, and the urban environment. Each of these ecosystems is home to a diverse assemblage of wild animals. Students will conduct authentic ecological research on wildlife found in Malibu and will learn how science informs the conservation of nature.

*Invasive Predators and Amphibian Decline

GSNS 199.04* | Lee Kats, Frank R. Seaver Chair in Natural Science (Seminars in Biology)

Invasive Predators and Amphibian Decline:Invasive species can harm native amphibians by competing for resources, transmitting disease, hybridizing, or through direct predation on adults, eggs, or larvae. Students in this seminar will investigate the role of invasive predators in amphibian decline, specifically in freshwater streams of the Santa Monica Mountains of southern California, near Malibu.

Preparing for a Life of Purpose, Service, and Leadership

GSRE 199.01 | Mark Davis | TuFr 2:00pm - 3:30pm

Preparing for a Life of Purpose, Service, and Leadership: This course will examine how people find purpose in life, with special emphasis on how Christian beliefs inform this search. We'll also relate the philosophical search for meaning to practical everyday ethics in lively class discussions about current moral issues. You'll be encouraged to cultivate an ethic of service and discern God's call to use your gifts in leadership. Readings include classic texts such as Viktor Frankl's Man's Search for Meaning and C.S. Lewis' Mere Christianity, as well as the national bestsellers Tuesdays with Morrie, The Purpose-Driven Life, and The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. This class also includes co-curricular activities related to the texts such as a visit to the Museum of Tolerance Holocaust Remembrance Exhibit, dinner with a holocaust survivor, and service to the Veterans Home of California.

The Meaning of Life

GSRE 199.02 | Tomás Bogardus | TuFr 10:00am - 11:30am

The Meaning of Life:What is the world like and what is our place in it? We’ll consider the three dominant answers: Naturalism (only what’s physical is real), Supernaturalism (God determines what’s true), and Postmodernism (truth is a “social construct”). By the end of the course, each student will be in a better position to understand, state, and defend her own worldview. At the same time, each student will develop a deeper sympathy and appreciation for those views she does not accept. Our conversations of each view will focus on the existence of God, the nature and value of life, what makes us human, what grounds morality, and what the goal or purpose of life is. So, this course will be particularly useful for students interested in medicine, law, religion, or philosophy.

What Actually Matters

GSRE 199.03 | Mason Marshall | TuFr 2:00pm – 3:30pm

What Actually Matters:What makes life good—in other words, what matters enough to shape your life around it—and how can you tell? Major thinkers over the years have had a lot to say in response to these questions. We’ll consider their various responses, weigh the evidence, and together try to figure out what the correct answers are. The course will be heavy on joint discussion and light on lecture, but all our conversations will be informed. They will take us into issues as diverse as whether there is a God, what the relation between the body and the mind is, and how to decide whom to marry. Issues like those are philosophical issues, and the course content reflects the academic discipline of philosophy, but the course is designed for students who have no background in that discipline whatsoever.

Hope in the Age of Climate Change

GSRE 199.04 | Chris Doran | TuFr 2:00pm – 3:30pm

Hope in the Age of Climate Change:Climate change can seem bleak and daunting. Already, for example, drought and rising sea levels are forcing millions of human beings to relocate, and countless nonhuman species will be extinct by the end of the century. It is tempting to despair, yet Christians are supposed to be hopeful even in the darkest times. In this course, we will explore the Christian resources for being agents of change in a world that often sees little value in caring for creation. Among other things, we will consider how our daily eating habits and economic decisions can be hopeful witnesses of our faith. This course involves perspectives from theology, science, economics, politics, environmental justice, food justice, as well as a few others. For students who are interested, this course also serves as an introduction to Seaver College’s new interdisciplinary minor in sustainability.

Interpersonal Relationships and Communication

GSSO 199.01 | Emily Scott-Lowe | MoTh 10:00am – 11:30am

Interpersonal Relationships and Communication: Students will develop a working knowledge of the characteristics that have been identified through research as being important in effective and healthy relationships. The challenges in relationships are also studied. Various kinds of relationships are examined, including friends, roommates, parents and family members, professors, work relationships, romantic relationships, as well as characteristics of lasting marriages. Through this course, students learn the skills and attitudes that are essential for developing and maintaining healthy relationships. Opportunities are provided to experiment and practice effective relationship skills.

Loneliness

GSSO 199.02 | Khan Bui | MoWe 6:00pm – 7:3pm

Loneliness:Loneliness is a painful awareness that one’s social relationships are less numerous or meaningful than one desires. Loneliness does not necessarily coincide with aloneness. To feel lonely is to feel excluded from a group, unloved by those surrounding oneself, unable to share one’s private concerns, or alienated from those in one’s surroundings. This seminar will examine the latest research on loneliness and ways to cope with loneliness. Furthermore, as a course that introduces the student to the college experience, it strives to sharpen critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, enhance effective communication through writing assignments and oral presentations, improve information literacy, apply the University’s Christian mission, and instill a proactive approach to lifelong learning.

College Mental Health- Understanding Challenges and Developing Healthy Coping

GSSO 199.03 | Connie Horton | MoWe 4:00pm – 5:30pm

College Mental Health - Understanding Challenges and Developing Healthy Coping: This seminar will introduce students to the literature regarding college mental health. Readings, videos, class discussions and other activities will encourage academic understanding and personal application of the issues. Students will be encouraged to develop healthy coping habits, including integration of psychological principles and faith, for their university years and beyond.

Created for Community

GSSO 199.04 | Shelley Welty | TuTh 4:00pm – 5:30pm

Created for Community:Students in this seminar will be introduced to the extraordinary impact of community life. Students will engage in campus activities, discuss relevant research and essays, and reflect on their own personalities and abilities in order to develop a greater understanding of how they can benefit from and support others in community. Students will be challenged to develop an understanding of their potential role(s) in this and other communities.

Relational Intelligence in our Technological World

GSSO 199.05 | Kelly Haer | W 1:00pm – 3:50pm

Relational Intelligence in our Technological World:According to a Harvard longitudinal study, quality relationships are the single best predictor for life satisfaction. Learn about the biology, psychology, and theology that underlies how to build healthy relationships with God, family, friends, romantic partners, and co-workers. Special emphasis will be given to exploring how technology impacts relationships for better and for worse. While strengthening your relational intelligence, you will also hone your presentation skills and help further develop a psycho-educational curriculum for young adult relationships.

Social Action and Justice Colloquium

SAAJ 121.01 | Jeff Banks | We 11:00am – 3:30pm

Social Action and Justice Colloquium: Do you care about social justice? This is an experiential course that involves service. We will go on field trips to Skid Row, Prisons, Disability Centers, Environmental sites, Museums, and other relevant sites. We will deal with issues that involve sex trafficking, prostitution, gangs, religious discrimination, and issues of race and class. Students will explore strategies for promoting social justice and engage in service learning activities. Students who enroll in this class will be a part of a four semester colloquium that may be completed any time before graduation. The sequence involves an internship that may be completed overseas. Completion of the SAAJ Colloquium fulfills four General Education requirements.

Social Action and Justice Colloquium

SAAJ 121.02 | Lorie Goodman | We 11:00am – 3:30pm

Social Action and Justice Colloquium: Do you care about social justice? This is an experiential course that involves service. We will go on field trips to Skid Row, Prisons, Disability Centers, Environmental sites, Museums, and other relevant sites. We will deal with issues that involve sex trafficking, prostitution, gangs, religious discrimination, and issues of race and class. Students will explore strategies for promoting social justice and engage in service learning activities. Students who enroll in this class will be a part of a four semester colloquium that may be completed any time before graduation. The sequence involves an internship that may be completed overseas. Completion of the SAAJ Colloquium fulfills four General Education requirements.

Social Action and Justice Colloquium

SAAJ 121.03 | Roslyn Satchel | We 11:00am – 3:30pm

Social Action and Justice Colloquium: Do you care about social justice? This is an experiential course that involves service. We will go on field trips to Skid Row, Prisons, Disability Centers, Environmental sites, Museums, and other relevant sites. We will deal with issues that involve sex trafficking,
prostitution, gangs, religious discrimination, and issues of race and c lass. Students will explore strategies for promoting social justice and engage in service learning activities.
Students who enroll in this class will be a part of a four semester colloquium that may be  completed anytime before graduation. The sequence involves an internship that may be completed overseas.Completion of the SAAJ Colloquium fulfills four General Education requirements.

Finding Meaning in The Hero's Journey through Narrative Film

GSCO 199.02 | John Sitter | W 12:00pm – 2:50pm

Finding Meaning in The Hero's Journey through Narrative Film: What trials unite not only Luke Skywalker, Katniss Everdeen, and Frodo Baggins, but many of literature and film's most interesting heroes? And what do ordinary people have in common with these heroes? What do you have in common with heroic acts in order to gain a better understanding of our own hero's journey? We will share our "calls to adventure" and how these have shaped who we are today. This investigation into Films and Comparative Mythology can lead us to a better understanding of ourselves and to a deeper appreciation of our lives and our relationships with others. Additionally, we will explore the differences and connections between individual career goals and vocational goals for life. 

Resisting Evil / Hitler

GSCL 199.04 | David Dowdey | T F 2:00pm-­3:30pm

Resisting Evil / Hitler: The course surveys accounts of people in the German Resistance from 1933-1945 in order to understand, compare, think critically, and write about the various decisions of conscience made by these individuals. Their stories will help us to act responsibly in the face of evil in our own day and age. A further objective of this course is to help you adjust to life at Pepperdine as you make the transitions into full adulthood. Finally, the course is intended to facilitate the formation of a group with which you identify strongly and positively. 

Critically Consuming the News

GSC0 199.03 | Christina Littlefield | W 12:00pm -­ 2:50pm

Critically Consuming the News: How to spot fake news, media bias, and critique coverage to stay informed. This FYS will discuss news coverage of current events and discuss the news media's role in a democracy, where media serves the public well and where it falls short. Students will learn how journalists do their jobs and the challenges and ethical issues they face. Students will learn how to critically consume the news to be more informed citizens. 

 

Great Books Colloquium I

GSHU121.08 | Jeffrey Schultz | TuFr 12:00pm - 1:50pm

Great Books Colloquium I: Students who enroll in Great Books I are automatically enrolled in the Great Books program, which consists of four integrated seminars devoted to the study of Great Books from ancient Greece to present day. In Great Books I, students consider works of philosophy, literature, religion, and political thought of the ancient world. Authors include Homer, Greek tragedians, Plato, Aristotle, and Virgil. The course is discussion-based and involves close reading of texts and intensive writing. Each seminar is limited to 16 students. Prerequisite: Eligibility for entry in English Composition 101 (GE). Great Books I fulfills the First Year Seminar Requirement, and completion of the four-course sequence fulfills five general education requirements. 

Additional options will be added over summer.

 

* These seminars are part of the "Seminars in Biology that Engage Students in the Creation of New Knowledge": First-year Students as Scholars
Seminars in Biology that Engage Students in the Creation of New Knowledge: http://seaver.pepperdine.edu/naturalscience/student-opportunities/sas/

Often students begin college with the goal of simply being consumers of knowledge; in the biology seminars listed below, students will transcend this notion by developing the skills and confidence to create new knowledge with faculty mentors. The primary objective of Students as Scholars (SAS) Seminars is to engage biology majors inauthentic research and the scholarly process. A secondary goal of these seminars is to inform students of the many options in biology and the rationale for the basic scientific skills learned in conventional introductory courses such as biology, chemistry, math, and physics. By
the end of the first semester, students will realize the power of the scientific method, the excitement of scientific discovery, and the thrill of sharing personal research findings with a broader audience. SAS-seminars will be process-rich, focused on student engagement in scholarly research whereas conventional introductory science courses will be content-rich focused on acquiring the basic tools and theory necessary for scholarly research.

Seminar Options
Invasive Predators and Amphibian Decline, mentored by Dr. Lee Kats, Frank R. Seaver Chair in Natural Science and Professor of Biology. Invasive species can harm native amphibians by competing for resources, transmitting disease, hybridizing, or through direct predation on adults, eggs, or larvae. Students in this seminar will investigate the role of invasive predators in amphibian decline, specifically in freshwater streams of the Santa Monica Mountains of southern California, near Malibu.

Plant Adaptation to Stressful Environments, mentored by Dr. Stephen Davis, Distinguished Professor of Biology. Native plants that blanket the hillsides of Pepperdine's campus in Malibu are usually adapted to survive stressful conditions, but tolerance levels have recently been exceeded due to climate change. Students in this seminar will undertake authentic scholarly research on one of the most pressing issues concerning our future well-being
in California, will adaptations of native vegetation be sufficient to withstand an increasingly rapid change in climate? Students will assess plant water status, dehydration tolerance,photosynthetic performance, plant water use, and dysfunction in vascular transport.

The Cell Biology of Stress, mentored by Dr. Jay Brewster, Professor of Biology. With increasing industrialization and human population growth, air pollution has become an environmental threat to human health. Students in this seminar will expose human cells in tissue culture to nanoparticles increasingly found in the air we breath as well as improvise simple methods to assess cellular stress, survival, and biochemical activity. Methods of analyses will include light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, immunoblot analysis of signaling proteins, and assays for metabolic function.

Genetics of Animal and Plant Populations, mentored by Dr. Rodney Honeycutt, Professor of Biology, and Divisional Dean of Natural Science Division. Students in this seminar are fortunate to have several on-going projects related to plant and animal populations in the Santa Monica Mountains surrounding our Malibu campus as well as several of the eight islands off the Malibu coastline. Students will focus their research on the use of genetic markers to aid in the conservation of biological organisms and learn the basic tools of conservation genetics including DNA extraction, PCR amplification, sequencing,
genotyping, and data analysis. For a full description, see the following URL: http://seaver.pepperdine.edu/naturalscience/student-opportunities/sas