Laboratory Science - Pepperdine University - Seaver College

Laboratory Science

This requirement aims to foster scientific values of curiosity, tolerance for ambiguity, openness to new ideas, and the joy and progress that result from sharing knowledge. It also teaches that our understanding of the world is limited and always subject to questions and revision.

Students will practice observation, data collection, quantitative skills, and explanation of phenomena and will ultimately see the ways in which science is applicable to everyday life.

Courses fulfilling the Laboratory Science requirement:

BIOL 105 Introduction to Marine Biology (4 units)

With an emphasis on Southern California's marine environment, this course provides an introduction to biological principles directed at an examination of the various ocean ecosystems and their inhabitants. Does not count for major credit, nor does the grade received count in the major GPA. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Tier I laboratory fee will be assessed.

BIOL 106 Principles of Biology (4)

An introductory course in the fundamental principles of biology with emphasis on cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, and human physiology. Does not count for major credit, nor does the grade received count in the major GPA. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Tier I laboratory fee will be assessed.

BIOL 107 Plants and the Environment (4)

Studies the relationships of plants to the environment, with emphasis on the importance of plants to humans for food, fiber, fuel, and medicine. Emphasis will also be given to the management and preservation of our natural vegetation resources of Southern California coastal marsh, coastal sage scrub, chaparral, conifer forest, desert scrub, and grassland. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Does not count for major credit, nor does the grade received count in the major GPA. Tier I laboratory fee will be assessed.

BIOL 108 Genetics and Human Affairs (4)

A study of the biological process by which genetic information and common genetic traits are transmitted from one generation to the next. Causes and treatments of common inherited diseases and the biochemical nature of genes are discussed, as well as the current social issues in genetics, including applications of recombinant DNA technology, genetic engineering, genetics or organ and tissue transplantation, and inheritance of intelligence and behavior. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Does not count for major credit, nor does the grade received count in the major GPA. Tier 1 laboratory fee will be assessed.

BIOL 109 Introduction to Animal Behavior (4)

Introduces students to the diversity of behavioral adaptations animals have for survival. Emphasis will be placed on current fields of interest and research in animal behavior. Methodology and techniques necessary for investigation in behavior will also be discussed. Some time will be spent examining behavioral adaptations that conflict with the rapidly changing environment and the subsequent impact on animal populations. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Does not count for major credit, nor does the grade received count in the major GPA. Tier I laboratory fee will be assessed.

NASC 101 Science as a Way of Knowing (4)

This course centers on a number of topics of common interest to different fields of science. Emphasis is given to the nature of the scientific process as one way in which humans attempt to describe and explain natural phenomena. Historical examples are drawn from a number of areas of the natural sciences, with special attention given to the structure of the atom, the functions of living cells, genetics, and evolution. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory each week. Tier I laboratory fee will be assessed. Does not count for major credit.

NASC 108 Beginning Geology (4)

An introductory course in modern geology. Students will be given a thorough base in the concepts and terminology of physical geology as well as a look at historical geology. Special attention will be paid to geological diversity of Southern California and Malibu in particular. Local field trips plus one weekend overnight trip. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Tier I laboratory fee will be assessed. Does not count for major credit.

NASC 109 Introduction to Astronomy (4)

This is an introductory course in astronomy that explores the origins of the universe, galaxies, and solar systems. Emphasis is placed on the observational aspects of astronomy using telescopes at local observation sites and the tools of the astronomer in the laboratory. Students will learn to use logical and critical methods of analysis. Tier I laboratory fee will be assessed. Does not count for major credit.

NASC 155 Physical Science: A Way of Knowing (4)

Basic principles of physics and chemistry will be introduced and illustrated. The basic concepts are motion and its causes, descriptions of matter, the study of energy in many forms, and how man interacts with nature. Basic mathematics and computer analysis of laboratory data will be developed and applied. Emphasizes the subject matter of the California "Science Framework" for education majors. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Does not count for major credit. Tier I laboratory fee will be assessed.

NASC 156 Earth Science: A Way of Knowing (4)

The historical and philosophical development of science and the role of famous scientists and world views are introduced. Science concepts are introduced through the study of astronomy, geology, meteorology, and oceanography. The interconnectedness of the sciences is emphasized, including the calendar and time, the earth in the cosmos, and the stability and instability of the natural phenomena which affect man at the surface of the earth. The course emphasizes the earth science part of the subject matter of the California "Science Framework" for secondary education students. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Does not count for major credit. Tier I laboratory fee will be assessed.

NUTR 210 Contemporary Issues in Nutrition (4)

A study of the principles of human nutrition throughout the life cycle. Current topics and controversies in nutrition and health are discussed. A personal dietary analysis is a component of this course. Lecture three hours per week; laboratory and related work two hours per week. Tier I laboratory fee will be assessed.

SPME 106 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)

A structural and functional survey of the human body, including skeletal, muscular, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and genito-urinary systems. Laboratories include examination of cardiovascular, respiratory, nervous system, and digestive functions and evaluation of human performance. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory session per week. Does not count for sports medicine major credit.

 

These major specific courses also satisfy the requirement:

 BIOL 230 Human Anatomy (4)

     A structural survey of the human body, including skeletal, muscular, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and genito-urinary systems. Laboratory includes dissection of biological specimen and examination of prosected human cadaver specimen. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. This class does not fulfill degree requirements for either the B.A. or B.S. degree in biology and will not count as a biology elective. Enrollment is intended for sports medicine majors only. Tier II laboratory fee will be assessed.

BIOL/SPME 270 Principles of Human Physiology (4)

     An integrated study of the body's functional systems with particular attention to fundamental physiology. Emphasis is placed on mechanisms of function, especially cellular and molecular mechanisms. The course uses physical and chemical principles to present information regarding the body's organ systems. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 230, CHEM 120, and CHEM 120L. Tier II Laboratory fee will be assessed.

CHEM 120 General Chemistry I (3)

     A study of the fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Includes stoichiometry and reaction chemistry, quantum mechanics, bonding and structures, and chemical laws. Three Lectures per week. Prerequisites: high school chemistry, two years of high school algebra or equivalent and a Math score of 620 on the new SAT, 600 on the old SAT, or 27 on the ACT; or C- or above for Math 103. To be taken concurrently with CHEM 120L (Four hours of laboratory and tutorial per week. Laboratory consists of an introduction to qualitative and quantitative experimentation and applications of basic chemical principles. Tier II laboratory fee will be assessed.).

PHYS 202 General Physics I (4)

     The first course in a two-course survey of general physical principles and their applications in the life sciences. Topics include kinematics, linear and rotational mechanics, oscillation and wave mechanics, and fluid dynamics. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: MATH 150 (or concurrent enrollment) or consent of the instructor. Tier II laboratory fee will be assessed.

PHYS 210 Physics I (5)

     A calculus-based study of Newtonian mechanics: forces, work, collisions, rotation, oscillation, gravity, and fluids. Thermodynamics: heat, work, and entropy. Four hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite or co-requisite: MATH 150. Tier II laboratory fee will be assessed.