Human Institutions and Behavior - Pepperdine University - Seaver College

Human Institutions and Behavior

This requirement explores various ways in which human institutions and behaviors can be studied, understood, and predicted. The three courses, from which students choose two, provide valuable insight into interactions, societal patterns, and human nature.

Courses fulfilling the Human Institutions and Behavior requirement:

ECON 200 Economic Principles (4 units)

A general introduction to the principles of micro- and macroeconomics, intended for non-economics majors. The microeconomic portion revolves around policy-relevant concerns on a small scale (earnings determination, poverty, private market failure, public market failure, etc.). The historical and institutional aspects of contemporary capitalism are then incorporated into the analysis, with particular emphasis on the role of government. The macroeconomic portion is concerned with key economic variables, such as income, price and output indices, employment and unemployment, and interest rates.

PSYC 200 Introduction to Psychology (3 units)

A general introduction to the study of the science of psychology, intended for non-psychology majors. Consideration is given to the basic issues and research in human growth and development, perception, sensation, learning, thinking, motivation, emotion, personality, assessment, psychotherapy, and social behavior. Students majoring in psychology should take PSYC 210.

SOC 200 Introduction to Sociology (3 units)

A general introduction to the history, principles, and methodology of sociology intended for non-sociology majors. Emphasis is on introducing students to the sociological analysis of human groups, institutions, and societies.

Psychology majors should take PSYC 210 instead of PSYC 200.

PSYC 210 Foundations of Psychology (4 units)

A comprehensive study of the science of psychology. Consideration of the basic issues and research in human growth and development, perception, sensation, learning, thinking, motivation, emotion, personality, assessment, psychotherapy, and social behavior. Also includes bibliographic instruction, an introduction to APA-style writing, an introduction to the major, and information about professional training as a psychologist. For psychology majors or industrial/organizational minors only.

Students majoring in business, accounting, economics, and international studies (economics specialization) should take BA/ECON 210 and ECON 211 and either PSYC 200 or SOC 200.

BA/ECON 210 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 units)

A study of the factors underlying the economic decisions of households and business units; analysis of the determinants of demand and supply, utility, and costs or production; price and output determination under various market structure; and pricing and employment of resources.

ECON 211 Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 units)

An introduction to the principles of economic analysis, institutions, issues, and policies. Emphasis is on national income, monetary and fiscal policy, international trade, resource allocation, and income distribution through the price system.