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Academics

Meet the Faculty

Photo of Priscilla Gilliam MacRae

Priscilla Gilliam MacRae
Professor of Sports Medicine
Director of Motor Behavior Laboratory

Division: Natural Science Division
Office: Rockwell Academic Center (RAC) 195
Phone: (310) 506-4162
E-mail: priscilla.macrae@pepperdine.edu

  • Post-doctoral Fellow, University of Southern California Andrus Gerontology Center, 1985
  • Ph.D., Exercise Science, University of Texas at Austin, 1984
  • M.S., Exercise Science, University of Arizona, 1979
  • B.S., Physical Education/Kinesiology, Pepperdine University, 1978
Courses:
  • Introduction to the Exercise Sciences (SPME 110)
  • Human Anatomy (SPME/BIOL 230)
  • Neuroscience and Motor Control (SPME410)
  • Research Methods in Sports Medicine and Nutrition (MATH 317)
  • Motor Learning and Development (SPME250)
Key Awards/Affiliations:
  • Recognition Award from Southwest Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine in 2011
  • Endowed Professorship - Frank R. Seaver Professor of Natural Science
  • Howard A. White Award for Teaching Excellence
  • Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine (FACSM)
  • Keynote Speaker, V World Congress on Physical Activity, Aging, and Sport
Academic Interests:
  • Exercise effects on physical and cognitive function
  • Aging effects on motor control
  • Exercise training to promote independence, decrease disability and reduce health care costs in older adults
  • How to optimize motor skill acquisition across the lifespan
Selected Works:
  • Francis, K.L., MacRae P.G., Spirduso, W.W., & Eakin, T. (2012). The effects of age and practice on precision pinch force control. Current Aging Science, 5 (1), 2-12.
  • Feltner, M.E & MacRae, P.G. (2011). Time course of changes in novice jumpers' countermovement vertical jump performance. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 112(1), 228-242.
  • Spirduso, W.W., Francis, K.L. & MacRae, P.G. (2005). Physical Dimensions of Aging, 2nd edition. Champaign, Illinois: Human Kinetics.
  • MacRae, P.G. (2001). Addressing the physical activity needs of the oldest-old. Healthy and Active Aging, 7, 79-101.